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Find Out Where and How Relief International is Responding to COVID-19 Pandemic

Refugees, families displaced from their homes, and the people we serve in the world’s most fragile settings will be hit hardest by the COVID-19 pandemic. The virus has officially reached all of the sixteen countries where Relief International works. Our teams are on the frontline every day, responding to outbreaks in the world’s most fragile settings.


Get live updates on our COVID-19 response
Rohingya refugees continue their way after crossing from Myanmar into Palang Khali, near Cox's Bazar in Bangladesh. Hannah McKay/Reuters
Key Issues

Refugees & IDPs

Nearly 71 million people are forcibly displaced worldwide.

The latest data from the office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees shows a disturbing rise in global displacement year after year. Today, the number of people forced to flee is the highest in recorded history.

Conflict and natural disasters continue to be the main drivers of displacement, forcing people to move within their own countries or across borders as refugees.

Millions are made to leave their homes behind at a moment’s notice to escape turbulent events in their home countries. Often, these populations in vulnerable situations are then sheltered among the poorest communities, sharing scarce resources with host communities for years. Protracted crises in Afghanistan, Syria, and South Sudan, which are responsible for the majority of the world’s refugees, have sparked a heartbreaking legacy of displacement whose impact will be felt for generations.

At Relief International, we work alongside people on the move to find safety on their journeys and upon their arrival. We make no distinction in how we respond to the needs of refugees, internally displaced people (IDPs), or members of the communities that host them, and go to great lengths to provide critical services to these groups in vulnerable situations to ensure they can live with the safety and dignity they deserve.

On the Move

Our work with refugees, IDPs, and people on the move.

Bangladesh

Two Years Later: The Rohingya Refugee Crisis Continues

Relief International’s programs continue to support the diverse needs of hundreds of thousands of Rohingya refugees living in vulnerable situations in Bangladesh.

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Lebanon

Cash Assistance Helps Meet Syrian Refugees’ Most Urgent Needs

Lebanon’s Bekaa Valley shelters more than 350,000 Syrian refugees, 71% of whom live below the poverty line. Syrian refugee, Yara, who receives cash assistance from Relief International, tells her story.

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Turkey

Providing Life-Changing Prosthetics for Syrian Refugees

One and a half million people in Syria are currently living with permanent impairments, including over 80,000 who have lost limbs.

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Bangladesh

Rohingya Crisis: “I’ve never shared my story before.”

Inside Relief International’s Women & Girl Friendly Spaces in Kutupalong refugee camp, roughly 100 women gather each day to escape the realities of life inside the camp.

 

 

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Sudan

The Darfur Crisis: Then and Now

Fifteen years after the Darfur crisis began, the humanitarian situation in Sudan continues to deteriorate following years of conflict, poverty, and under-development.

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Iran

Respected Guests: Supporting Afghans in Iran

Today Iran hosts one of the world’s largest populations of refugees. Most are from neighboring Afghanistan where conflict and economic desperation has forced millions of people to migrate in search of a better life.

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Jordan

“Wherever life takes me, I will use my education to get there”

Relief International is the only provider of education inside Jordan’s Za’atari and Azraq refugee camps. Our signature project is a year-long prep course for the Tawjihi, the final exam students are required to take to graduate from high school.

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Bangladesh. Rachel Elkind/RI

Bangladesh

Two Years Later: The Rohingya Refugee Crisis Continues

Randa holds her son Jasem, 2, in front of her makeshift shelter in Bekaa Valley, Lebanon. Elie Gardner/RI

Lebanon

Cash Assistance Helps Meet Syrian Refugees’ Most Urgent Needs

Rahaf is a technician who makes prosthetic limbs at Relief International's clinic. Rachel Elkind/RI

Turkey

Providing Life-Changing Prosthetics for Syrian Refugees

Bangladesh. Rachel Elkind/RI

Bangladesh

Rohingya Crisis: “I’ve never shared my story before.”

A woman attends a nutrition awareness session at one of Relief International's healthcare centers in Sudan's Zamzam camp. Elie Gardner/ RI

Sudan

The Darfur Crisis: Then and Now

Afghan refugees in Iran. Pierre Prakash/ECHO

Iran

Respected Guests: Supporting Afghans in Iran

Jordan. Elie Gardner/RI

Jordan

“Wherever life takes me, I will use my education to get there”

Bangladesh. Rachel Elkind/RI
Randa holds her son Jasem, 2, in front of her makeshift shelter in Bekaa Valley, Lebanon. Elie Gardner/RI
Rahaf is a technician who makes prosthetic limbs at Relief International's clinic. Rachel Elkind/RI
Bangladesh. Rachel Elkind/RI
A woman attends a nutrition awareness session at one of Relief International's healthcare centers in Sudan's Zamzam camp. Elie Gardner/ RI
Afghan refugees in Iran. Pierre Prakash/ECHO
Jordan. Elie Gardner/RI
Bangladesh. Rachel Elkind/RI

Two Years Later: The Rohingya Refugee Crisis Continues

Randa holds her son Jasem, 2, in front of her makeshift shelter in Bekaa Valley, Lebanon. Elie Gardner/RI

Cash Assistance Helps Meet Syrian Refugees’ Most Urgent Needs

Rahaf is a technician who makes prosthetic limbs at Relief International's clinic. Rachel Elkind/RI

Providing Life-Changing Prosthetics for Syrian Refugees

Bangladesh. Rachel Elkind/RI

Rohingya Crisis: “I’ve never shared my story before.”

A woman attends a nutrition awareness session at one of Relief International's healthcare centers in Sudan's Zamzam camp. Elie Gardner/ RI

The Darfur Crisis: Then and Now

Afghan refugees in Iran. Pierre Prakash/ECHO

Respected Guests: Supporting Afghans in Iran

Jordan. Elie Gardner/RI

“Wherever life takes me, I will use my education to get there”